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Full text of "The Tattler"

THE 

TTL 






5i 



Williamsburg High School 
Wi lliamsburg, Massachusetts 



CONTENTS 



Prologue 

4 
Dedication " 

In Memory 

Faculty 

7 

Seniors 

14 
Hall of Fame x 

16 

Seniorscope 



Underclassmen. . 
Organizations . . 

Athletics 

Activities 

Alumni 

Epilogue 

Autographs 
Advertisements 



17 
21 

.29 
.37 
.41 
.43 
.44 
.45 



PROLOGUE 



The lights dimmed as the conductor took his place 
on the platform and raised his baton. Then softly 
the first strains of the symphony drifted slowly 
out over the vast audience, where an elderly, white- 
haired lady seemed to stand out above the rest. A 
placid, contented expression spread over her counte- 
nance as she listened avidly to the opening number. 
As the concert progressed, the music carried her 
thoughts back to those bygone days at Williamsburg 
High School. 

Memories of those happy years were like music to 
her as she let her thoughts reflect idly. Miss 
Dunphy was like the conductor whom everyone listened 
to and respected; the faculty, like a melody, some- 
times receding into the background, but ever present. 
They were our leaders as we strove toward our goals 
accompanied by songs of success. The Class of '54 
that worked harmoniously throughout their stay; the 
school dances; the basketball games with the school 
songs; and finally the prom and her favorite waltz. 
We, as seniors, were like harmonious tunes, with the 
underclassmen as our accompaniment. 

We are not all musicians but have a love for music 
which is a part of everyone's life. 

J. E. B. 




WILHELM WOEBKING 



The Class of 1954 dedicates the "Tattler" to 
Will Woebking, an exchange student from Germany. 
Will has been a loyal, jolly, and friendly school 
mate through the year and has taken an active part 
in our class and school activities since he has been 
with us. We hope that we may follow his example of 
leadership and cooperation, and we wish him success 
in whatever the future has in store for him when he 
returns to his homeland. 




GERALD RITTER 



With a feeling of deep gratitude and respect 
we recall the memory of Gerald Ritter, our 
science instructor during our Sophomore year, 
whose life so soon came to a close after he 
left us. 







Tu r\e - 





ELLEN JANE AMES 

"Clem" 
"Nothing is given so profusely as advice." 
Basketball 1,2; Cheerleader 2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3; 
Xmas Dance Committee 3; Freshmen Reception 
Committee 2,3,4; Play 4; Prom 3; School Paper 1; 
Tattler 4; Treasurer 1,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3; 



JANE ELIZABETH BEALS 

"Calamity" 
"Perseverence leads to success." 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee 
Club 2,3,4; Xmas Dance Committee 3; 
Freshmen Reception Comm.2,3,4; Play 3,4; 
Prom 3; Tattler Staff 3,4; School Paper 1; 
Pro Merito 4; Minstrel 3; Class Secretary 1; 
Vice President 2,3,4. 





ROBERT GEORGE BISBEE 

"Bob" 
"Eat, drink, and be merry. 
For tomorrow you may die." 
Class President 1,2,3,4; Play 4; Tattler 
Staff 4; Prom 3; Xmas Dance Committee 3: 
Freshmen Reception Committee 2, 3, 4; 
Representative Good Gov't. Day 4. 



SONDRA KAY BLACK 

"Sonnie" 
,f Where there's a will, there's a way." 
Orchestra 1,2,3; Chorus 3; Basketball 1,2,3; 
Play 4; DAR Good Citizen 4 





NANCY JANE BREWER 

"Nance" 
"Better to know nothing than half-know many 

things." 
Chorus 1,2,3; Basketball 1; Glee Club 3; 
Play 4. 




Ji 



i/ 



*. 



BARBARA MAE CUMM 

"Babs" 
"Laugh and the world laughs with you" 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Play 4; 
Prom 3; Tattler Staff 4; Xmas Dance Comm.3; 
Freshman Reception Comm. 3,4. 





YVONNE LOUISE DUFRESNE 

"Evie" 
"People who make no noise are dangerous" 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Tattler Staff 4; Prom 3; 
Play 4; Xmas Dance Comm. 3. 



WILLIAM LUCIUS HAYDEN 

"Bill" 
"He hath no leisure who useth it not." 
Freshmen Reception Comm. 2,3,4; Prom 3; 
Tattler Staff 4; Xmas Dance Committee 3; 
Play 4. 





ANNE LOUISE ICE 

"Annie" 
"Be useful where thou livest." 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Treasurer 2; Prom 3; Play 4; 
Tattler Staff 4; Xmas Dance Committee 3. 



10 



LUCY WALKER MATHERS 

"Lou" 
"Wait and Hope." 
Chorus 1, 2; Xmas Dance Committee 3; Prom 3. 








CONSTANCE MARGUERITE PACKARD 

"Connie" 
"Our greatest glory is not in never failing, 

but rising every time we fall." 
Chorus 1,2; Glee Club 1,2,3,4; Prom 3; 
Debating 1,2; Secretary 2,3,4; Play 4; 
Freshmen Reception Comm. 2,3,4; Xmas Dance 
Committee 3; Basketball Manager 2,3,4; 
Tattler Staff 3,4; Minstrel 3. 



JANICE MINNIE RICHARDSON 

"Jan" 
"Life is what we make it." 
Chorus 1,2,3; Glee Club 3; Play 3,4. 




11 




MARY ELIZABETH SMART 

"Smartie" 
"Be a live wire, not a dead weight." 
Chorus 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 3,4; Cheerleader 3,4; 
Tattler Staff 4; Freshmen Reception Committee 4; 
Xmas Dance Committee 3; Prom 3; Play 4; School 
Paper 1; Basketball 1,2. 



ANTHONY WALTER SOLTYS 

"Tony" 
"Prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them." 
Basketball 1,2,3; Debating 1,2; Play 4; Chorus 4; 
Tattler Staff 3,4; Baseball 1,2; Freshmen Recep- 
tion Comm. 3,4; Xmas Dance Committee 3; Prom 3. 





HELEN ANTOINETTE SCROCZYK 

"Helen" 
"She openeth her mouth with wisdom; 
and in her tongue is the law of kindness." 
Chorus 3; Freshmen Reception Committee 3; 
Pro Merito 3,4; Historian 1,2,3,4; Tattler 
Staff 4. 



12 



NORMAN EDWIN STONE 
"Norm" 

"Everyone should do his best at all 
times." 
Pro Merito 3,4; Tattler Staff 4; 
Play 4. 





WILHELM WOEBKING 
"Will" 

"Perseverence conquers all." 
Play 4; Chorus 4; Glee Club 4; 
Freshmen Reception Committee 4. 



- 




H 




W. WOEBKING Co PACKARD 
Actor Actress 

Best Dressed 




M. SMART 
Class Wit - Coquette 




Ro BISBEE - J. RICHARSON 
Best Natured 







M 



E 



S. BLACK 
Most Likely to Succeed 




H. SROCZYK 

Smartest - Most Studious 




J. BEALS 

Athlete 
Did Most for 
w . H. S . 
Most Popular 



R. BISBEE 



Most Popular 



14 




E. AMES - W. HAYDEN 

Best-Looking 
Businesslike 




H 




N. BREWER - W. WOEBKING 
Best Dancers 








Bo CUMM 
Garrulous 



A. ICE 
Artist 




T. SOLTYS - Y. DUFRESNE 
Noisiest Quietest 
Wolf 



M 




E 
15 



L. MATHERS - N. STONE 
Man Hater Woman Hater 
Best Dressed 



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Seated 1. to r. -Mary Baker, Janet Vayda,Allison Sharpe, Jacquelyn Morin, 
Beverly Richardson, Marilyn Pearl. Standing 1. to r. -Larry Sherk, Richard 
Braman, Linda Sanderson, Nancy Curtis, James Evans, Paul Harlow, Absent: 
Rolfe Bryant. 



JUNIORS 





The Junior Class of '55 returned to the old grind feeling superior to the Fi 
men and Sophomores and we were able to look down on them as underclassmen. 

Because the girls dominate the class, they won out in the class elections anc 
we have an all-girl officer's slate. Jacquelyn Morin was elected to lead us 
through this year, with Beverly Richardson as Vice-President, Alison Sharpe as 
Secretary, and Janet Vayda as Treasurer. 

We have made plans for the annual Junior Prom and we are sure it will be a 

success. , 

When we leave this Junior year behind, we will be looking forward to our Sei 
year and the good times that go with it. Although it seems like yesterday we 
were Freshmen, it will be but tomorrow when we are Seniors. 



18 



p ft ft 




First row seated, 1. to r. : Janet Higgins, Barbara Kellogg, Margaret Carter, 
Francis Leamy, Evelyn Warner, John Dymerski, Gloria Baker, Eldora Read. Second 
row: Nancy Muraski, Alice Nugent, Charlotte Hillenbrand, Joan Braman, Eugene 
Kolosewicz, Diane Besner, Ann Sullivan, Leona Shumway, JoAnn Dostie. Third 
row: Russell Leonard, Philip Bowie, Clark Bernier, Robert Healy, Joseph Moy- 
nahan, Robert Morton, James Hayes, Russell Bancroft, James Morin. 




SOPHOMORES 




In September 1953, twenty-eight students began their Sophomore year in high 
school. We elected as officers: President, John Dymerski; Vice-President, 
Francis Leamy; Secretary, Raymond Heath; Treasurer, Evelyn Warner; and His- 
torian, Margaret Carter. 

» 

Our class has been well represented in many of the school activities such as 
baseball, basketball, Glee Club, and Orchestra, Without the participants 
from our class the girls T and boys* basketball teams would not have been as 
successful as they were. With our one project of the year, the card party 
over, we are looking forward to another successful year as Juniors. 



19 




First row seated, 1. to r. : Christine Ice, Cornelia DeNood, Barbara 
Stanton, Nancy Wells, Frances Vayda, Jeannie Watling, Mary Brewer. 
Second row: Valerie Beaupre, Doris Cram, Malcolm Heath, June Allen, 
George Heath, David Smith, Sylvia Ferror, Irene Dufresne. Third row: 
Lida Sherk, Nancy Hillenbrand, Beverly Brooks, Donald Liimatainen, 
Betty Beals, Patricia Moynahan, Henrietta Ronka. Fourth row: Samuel 
Bowker, Neil Tennyson, Walter Boucher, John Merritt, Alison Lupien, 
Ralmon Black, David Breguet, Robert Cerreta, Rudolph Whittshirk. 




FRESHMEN 




In September, 1953, thirty-one timid freshmen entered Williamsburg High 
School as the Class of T 57. The first few days were bewildering, but with 
the understanding help of our home room teacher, Mrs. Grinnell, and our other 
teachers as to which door was which, when the bell rang, and which classes we 
were to attend, we fell into step with the upperclassmen. We elected the fol- 
lowing class officers: President, George Heath; Vice-President, June Allen; 
Secretary, Malcolm Heath; Treasurer, David Smith; Historian, Betty Beals. 

On October 8th, the Seniors invited us to "Freshmen Reception", our first 
venture into "social life in high school". Soon terrifying midyears were 
upon us, but we survived. In all athletic events we have loyal participants 
or supporters. We shall continue to support our high school in work, play, 
and all school activities. 



20 



mHmmm 




1 



■ * . >m . 



v m it*< * *mm*gar™e-^tt-'m-*r~4f mm ~*'^^ m ^ 



21 




o 

R 

C 
H 
E 

S 
T 
R 
A 



L. to R. : Betty Sherk, Larry 
Sherk, Leona Shumway, John 
Merritt, Lida Sherk. 



P 
R 

O 

M 
E 
R 

I 

T 
O 




L. to R. : Alison Sharpe, Jane 
Beals, Larry Sherk, Norman 
Stone, J.icquelyn Morin, Helen 
Sroczyk. Seated: Miss Dunphy. 




22 



m *fl t \i 



First row seated, 1. to r.: Mary Brewer, Sylvia Ferron, Cornelia DeNood, 
Jane Beals, Jacquelyn Morin, Gloria Baker, Alison Sharpe, Mary Smart, 
Christine Ice. Second row: Janet Vayda, June Allen, Diane Besner, Char- 
lotte Hillenbrand, Nancy Hillenbrand, Leona Shumway, Nancy Curtis, Evelyn 
Warner, Linda Sanderson, Lida Sherk, Barbara Cumm, Connie Packard. Third 
row: Donald Liimatainen, Larry Sherk, David Smith, Will Woebking, James 
Hayes, Russell Bancroft, James Morin, Robert Healy. 




GLEE CLUB 

For high school students who like 
singing all types of music, the Glee 
Club, which meets every Monday morning, 
offers just such a program. 

This year, as in the past, the Glee 
Club attended the Western Massachusetts Music Festival in Pittsfield on May 15th 
and sang the following selections: "Trees" by Rasbach, "White Ships" by Grey, 
"The Open Road is Calling" by Brahms, "For Spacious Skies" by Peery. Two stu- 
dents, Larry Sherk and Will Woebking, played a piano duet. Very favorable re- 
ports were received concerning both entries. 

The Glee Club will take part in graduation and class night exercises. 



23 



TATTLER STAFF 




Standing 1. to r. : Mrs. Grinnell, Mrs. Smith, Anne Ice, Connie 
Packard, Yvonne Dufresne, William Hayden, Ellen Jane Ames, Anthony- 
Soltys, Larry Sherk, Paul Harlow. Seated: June Beals. 



Ed.-in-cheef J. Beals 

Assistant T. Soltys 

Business Manager C. Packard 

Assistants B. Cumm 

J. Morin 

M. Smart 

R. Bisbee 

H. Sroczyk 

Boys' Sports Ed T. Soltys 

Girls' Sports Ed E. J. Ames 

Alumni A. Sharpe 

Literary Ed L. Sherk 



Artists 



Photographers 



Typists 



A. Ice 

Y. Dufresne 

J. Merritt 

, . . . . B . Cumm 

C. Packard 

A. Sharpe 

W. Hayden 

N. Stone 

,Y. Dufresne 

E. J. Ames 

A. Ice 

M. Smart 





Editor and Business Manager 



Artists 



24 




DRIVER EDUCATION 



STOP 



D 
R 
I 
V 
E 
R 

E 
D 
U 

C 
A 

T 

I 


N 



The driver education class, instructed by Mr. Tonet, 
consisted of seventeen students this year. In the first 
part of the year we studied the textbook "Man and the 
Motor Car" and the pamphlet "Massachusetts Motor Vehicle 
Laws". Then we took a written test, which, if passed 
with an eighty, exempted the student from the standard 
oral test. Mr. Tonet borrowed the Smith School's dual- 
control car and managed to get each student through ap- 
proximately five hours of driving practice. Everyone 
who has attempted the license tests has succeeded. 

On May 18th, sponsored by the Northampton Registry 
of Motor Vehicles, four driving students, Jacquelyn 
Morin, Ann Sullivan, Mary Smart, and Larry Sherk, gave 
a televised panel discussion on "Teamwork for Safety". 

There are many advantages in getting a driver 1 s li- 
cense through the school. The student is taught not 
only how to drive, but also the proper driver habits 
and attitudes necessary to a good driver. For this 
reason a fifteen per cent reduction is made on the in- 
surance fee usually required on a car that is used by 
a teenage driver, 

LS 





25 




"Amici aut inlmici Caesaris?" 
ROUND THE CLOCK 

"Quelle est la lecon? w 




26 




R 

U 

N 
D 

T 
H 
E 

C 
L 

C 
K 



"Your speed test is no laughing matter." 





"That's about the size of it." 




27 




ROUND 



THE 



CLOCK 



"Who's the bird that ate the cat?" 







F i 


1 

i 


i/i 


i - * 


J. 3 





"Report cards-again!!" 

"What's your theory, Sherk?" ''Behind the iron door." 




"Is that school work, Mary?" 



28 




/ 






29 




L. to r. : Cornelia DeNood, Jacquelyn Morin, Linda Sanderson, 
Ellen Jane Ames, Nancy Muraski, Henrietta Ronka, Mary Smart. 



CHEERLEADERS 





Once again, the cheerleaders 
sparked on the court as they led 
the enthusiastic fans in cheering 
the team on to victory. 

The five veterans soon taught 
the two newcomers to the squad, 
Cornelia DeNood and Henrietta Ron- 
ka, the ropes of their new work 
and they, along with the others, 
performed to the best of their 
ability. 

Two girls, Ellen Jane Ames and 
Mary Smart, will be lost by gra- 
duation and we hope their replace- 
ments next year will be as faith- 
ful and interested in cheerleading 
as they were. 



30 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First row seated, 1. to r. : Donna Shumway, Diane Besner, 
Alison Sharpe, Jane Beals, Leona Shumway, JoAnn Dostie, 
Evelyn Warner, Second row: Coach Evelyn Kmit, Jeannie 
Watling, Lida Sherk, Sylvia Ferron, Patricia Moynahan, 
Nancy Curtis, Ann Sullivan, Betty Beals, Nancy Wells, 
Connie Packard. 



The t 53- t 54 season was another 
successful one for the girls 1 basket- 
ball team, as they won 9 out of 12 
attempts . 

Northfield proved to be the girls' 
toughest opponent this year, as they 
took both games from them. 

Jane Beals, an outstanding forward 
who has played on the first string 
for four years, will be lost by gra- 
duation. 

Rita Godin, Alice Hathaway, Su- 
zanne Graves, and Margaret Snow, all 
who entered high school in the fall, 
have played with the Freshmen team 
and they show much' promise as future 
players for Burgy High. 



Games 



Opp. Burgy 



Huntington 


25 


49 


Charlemont 


20 


43 


Smith School 


29 


48 


Hopkins 


6 


4b 


Northfield 


51 


43 


Sanderson 


22 


37 


Hopkins 


3 


38 


Northfield 


38 


34 


Sanderson 


31 


21 


Powers 


20 


42 


Powers 


39 


38 


Charlemont 


14 


37 



31 














32 








^— -* 



First row seated, 1. to r. : Paul Harlow, Eugene Kolosewicz, Joseph Moynahan, 
John Dymerski, George Heath, Russell Leonard. Second row: Ralmond Black, 
Ronald Packard, Samuel Bowker, Coach Earl Tonet, Malcolm Heath, John Rice, 
David Sikop. Abs. Raymond Heath. 

BOYS BASKETBALL TEAM 



Although the 1953-1954 bas- 
ketball team was hard hit by 
graduation, it enjoyed a fair- 
ly successful season winning 
8 out of 15 games. 

Williamsburg dropped its 
first four games, but led by 
co-captains Joe Moynahan and 
John Dymerski, the team al- 
though young and inexperienced 
displayed much determination) 
and competitive spirit. 

The "Frosty Kids", comprised 
of freshmen and sophomores, 
finished in second place in the 
Franklin League. However, the 
entire squad shows much promise 
and will definitely comprise 
our future winning teams. 









Opp. 


Burgy 








Smith's School 


42 


33 








Clarke School 


58 


54 








Huntington 




49 


36 








Smith's School 


49 


30 








Charlemont 




45 


47 








Chicopee 




34 


47 








Northfield 




48 


44 








Clarke School 


30 


44 








Sanderson 




35 


31 








Williston 


J.v. 


31 


42 








Northfield 




52 


68 








Sanderson 




57 


46 








Powers 




45 


74* 








Powers 




58 


69 








Charlemont 




46 


59 
724** 








* New single 


game scoring record. 








«* New team season scoring record. 






Name 


Pos. F 


.G. 


F.T. 


F.T. A. 


T.P. 


M.P 


Moynahan 


-c- 134 


77 


131 


345 • 


469 


Dymerski 


-rg- 


86 


30 


63 


202 


467 


Kolosewicz 


-rf- 


30 


21 


59 


81 


427 


Heath, R. 


-lg- 


14 


11 


27 


39 


427 


Harlow 


-lf- 


8 


9 


20 


25 


352 


Leonard 


-u- 


3 


1 


2 


7 


33 


Bowker 


-u- 


3 


1 


2 


7 


14 


Clark 


-u- 


2 


3 


7 


7 


32 


Packard 


-u- 


1 


5 


6 


7 


52 


Heath, G. 


-u- 


2 








4 


111 


Heath, M. 


-u- 














11 


Rice 


-u- 














9 



'■< New individual scoring record 



33 



Si 1/ ,\ 














^9k^ ' ' '] 


\}^M 


t 4 -^ ^ 


A 






^fe *~*& 

■7-s. 



34 




L. to r. : Mr. Tonet, Mr. Branch, 
Miss Dunphy, Mrs. Kmit. 



TESTIMONIAL BANQUET 



On May 13 the boys T and girls* basketball teams once again were honored 
with a turkey dinner at the Williamsburg Congregational Church. Coach 
Evelyn Kmit presented trophies to Jane Beals and Connie Packard, gradua- 
ting members of the team, and pins to the rest of the team. She then pre- 
sented similar pins to Mary Smart and Ellen Jane Ames, senior members of 
the cheerleading squad, and a 32" megaphone to the remaining five members. 
Coach Earl Tonet awarded his boys with sterling silver tie clasps. Mrs. 
Kmit and Mr. Tonet were presented a gift from their teams. Mr 3 Branch, 
Master of Ceremonies, provided us with an enjoyable evening. Our thanks 
once again to all concerned with the banquet. 




"You'll be surprised." 



Don't look so bored, fellows." "Another new addition." 



35 



B 
A 
S 
E 
B 
A 
L 
L 







First row, 1. to r.: Russell Leonard, Samuel Bowker, John Rice, 
Ronald Packard, Malcolm Heath, Raymond Heath. Second row, 1. to r: 
Robert Healy, John Dymerski, Coach Tonet, Joseph Moynahan, Richard 
Braman, Donald Liimatainen. 







Opp. 


Burgy 


Charlemont 


2 


1 


Northfield 


6 


5 


Powers 





6 


Clarke School 


2 


3 


Sanderson 


4 


5 


Charlemont 


4 





Powers 


1 


4 


Huntington 


3 


2 


Belchertown 





8 


Sanderson 


8 


4 


Season incomplete 






36 



1 




v_ 




p 6 



3 



6* 





F 


R 


R 


E 


E 


C 


S 


E 


H 


P 


M 


T 


A 


1 


N 







N 




i ■■* m 






i 

N 
A 
U 
G 
U 
R 
A 
T 
I 

N 

D 
A 
Y 





P 

I 
Z 
Z 
A 

P 
A 
R 
T 
Y 





"Who MM OunJt CaAolin*?" 

THE CAST OF THE PLAY 

Actor Played By 

Mrs. Eleanor Endicott, a piano teacher . . . Constance Packard 

Agnes, aged 24 Sondra Black 

Riccy,agcdl7 Norman Stone 

Beryl, aged 15 M *T Smart 

Cicely, aged 10 Mary Brewer 

Aunt Caroline J ane &*** 

Miss Mabbitt, Aunt Caroline's companion . . . Ellen Jane Ames 

Miss MacLain, Riccy's teacher Barbara Cumm 

David Thompson, Agnes' fiance Robert Bisbee 

Una Hagaman, a music pupil ..... Cornelia DeNood 
Lt. Clayton of the police Will Woebking 

STAGE HANDS 

Stage Manager Richard Braman 

Sound Effects . . Robert Morton, Jane Beals, Alison Sharpe 

Properties . . Lucy Mathers, Alison Sharpe, Robert Morton 

Lights Richard Braman 

Prompters Anne Ice, Yvonne Dufresne 

Advertising Jacqueline Morin 

Tickets Jeanne Watling, William Hayden 

39 










*3&JIH 


■ ^K _^fc V ^mA 


3L^p^ 


■■£»* (Q 



MUSIC FESTIVAL 




1 






INFORMAL 

SHOTS 

F 
SENIORS 





40 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Pres Richard Culver Ml 

Vice Pres . . . Harlan Nye f 44 

Sec Gordon Nash '30 

Treas Ester Loomis * 49 



Executive Committee for 2 years 



Nancy Bickford 
Louise Kellogg Goodhue 
Eleanor Mansfield 
George Rustemeyer 
Peter Shumway 



»52 
'33 
♦24 
'33 
'52 



CLASS OF 1952 



Sarah Adams Grand Union College 

Helen Baldwin. .. .Office of Northampton 

State Hospital 
Jeannine Bernier. . . .Married 

Nancy Bickford University of Mass. 

Joan Damon North Adams State 

Teachers' College 

Elson Hathaway Commercial College 

Richard Houghton. .. .University of Mass. 
Ruth Anne McAvoy. . . . Married 

Edward Merritt University of Mass. 

Lois Mollis on. .... .Married 

Sylvia Nye... Boy Scout Office, Northampton 
Eileen O'Brien.. ..Women's Air Force 

Gail Papineau Married 

Eugene Penf ield ... Parks School of 

Aeronautics 
Harry Pome roy. . ..University of N. M. 
Bruce Pur ringt on. . ..University of Mass. 
Peter Shumway. .. .Stockbridge School 

of Agriculture 
Norman Tiley .... Employed by First 

National Stores 
John Warner University of Mass. 



Executive Committee for 1 year 

Barbara Bis bee Swanda '29 

Fred Allen '41 

Ruth Mollison Dresser '45 

Hazel Hathaway Culver '27 

Maude Warner Sanderson '18 

CLASS OF 1953 

Joan Culver.. . .Hampton Mills, Easthampton 
Mary Curtis. .. .Cooley Dickinson Hospital 

School of Nursing 
Barbara Derouin. . . .Married 

Patricia Evans Office of Veterans' 

Hospital 
Richard Ferreira. . ..U. S. Army 

Mary Graves Married 

David Heath U. S. Air Force 

James Johnson. ...University of Mass. 
Julia Kolosewicz. .First National Bank 

of Northampton 
Sidney Nichols. ..University of Mass. 
Nancy Outhuse. . .Green Mountain Junior 

College 
Richard Pierce.... U. S. Navy 
Richard Pur ringt on... .U. S.Air Force 

Raymond Rice Atlantic Union College 

Karyl Ronka University of Mass. 

Ramon Sears Stockbridge School of 

AGriculture 

Frank Smith University of Mass. 

Jean Tiley Bay Path Junior College 



41 



BIRTHS 

Son to Richard Culver - 

Son to Marshall Warner 

Son to Helen Sylvester Vanassee 

Son to Dorothy Stimson Harry 

Donald Harry 
Daughter to Ester Mollison Korowski Ml 
Son to Ruth Mollison Dresser 
Son to Lois Mollison Bacon 
Son to Doris Shumway Sabastian 
Daughter to Robert McCord 
Son to Harry Warner Jr. 
Daughter to Robert Edwards 
Daughter to Hans Nietsche Jr. 
Daughter to Gail Papineau Sylvester '52 
Son to Rita Ice Bates 



DEATHS 

Mrs. Emma Smith 
Carlton Field 



1893 
1939 





MARRIAGES 




Ml 


Marilyn Black 


•51 


M6 


to Percy Culver 




M6 


Mae Sanderson 


M8 


M2 


to John Pavelcsyk 


M2 


M4 


Russell Warner 


M8 


Ml 


to Elaine Dickinson 




M5 


Gail Papineau 


'52 


'52 


to Allen Sylvester 




M9 


Barbara Derouin 


»53 


'50 


to Francis Hamlon 




M2 


Ruth McAvoy 


•52 


M2 


to Raymond Hathaway 




♦35 


Joan Baldwin 


•51 


♦52 


to Raymond La Course 




'50 


Joan Bachand 

to Walter Kopka 


»51 




Jtarlene Shay 


»51 




to Francis Shay 






Doris Shumway 


M9 




to Ralph Sabastian 






Mary Graves 


»53 




to Raymond Doyle 






Joseph Soltys 


•38 




to Elizabeth Kearney 






John O'Brien 


M3 




to Barbara Sullivan 






Anna Mae Sincage 


»50 




to Wallace Neill 






Barbara Outhuse 


M8 




to Harry Baker 






Elizabeth Hat ho way 


»51 




to John Maggs 






Ruth Wells 


M8 




to Ralph Rhodes 






Robert Toski 


t44 




to Lynn Stewart 






Jeannine Bernier 


•52 




to Francis St. Jacques 






Eileen O'Brien 


•52 




to John Shiner 






Helen Baldwin 


»52 




to Phillipp McDonald 





42 



EPILOGUE 



As the orchestra built up to a climax, 
the white-haired lady was reminded of an 
active senior year; of class night; and 
finally graduation and the triumphant beat 
of the graduation march. 

Suddenly a thunderous burst of applause 
brought her back to reality, and as the o- 
vation died away, she realized how much 
high school was like a gigantic rehearsal 
preparing its musicians for the life they 
must lead as future citizens of their com- 
munities, regardless of changes in time 
or forms of discord. 

She rose and joined the crowd slowly 
moving toward the exit, a sweet smile of 
peace on her face. 

With music as an inspiration and a re- 
newal of courage we selected this theme 
and set to work on this yearbook. 



J. E. B. 



43 



A» 



p^OG R/lp^ 



<* 




44 



** 



I 



t 

/ 








\ 



/ 



/ 



J 



pet cdiadiffe 

Opposite. Grange Ha// Lji/ / i/tnisburg 

/#tcnt /7?tcJ,c f hiS - Greeting Cs?rds 

rto»7ttn#G/£ JTcz Crevm - T^Mod/ca/s 
Of hit flecks 7o~o /l/vmtrous To ttfe r>tion 



C/ ns/\ for if 



tie'// find if. 




8 Main St. 



Luncheonette - Fountain 
Home Made Pies 

Tel. 59 4 



Williamsburg 



II 



Compliments of 

HILLSIDE ORCHARD 

Apples Peaches 

Maple Syrup 



Compliment* of 



W. E. KELLOGG & SON 



DAIRY and POULTRY PRODUCTS 



Tel. 3631 



Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



NOBLE MANUFACTURING 



COMPANY, INC. 



Compliments of 



GUSETTI'S 




!^*>*??P. 



? &wms8ti 



^no6s. 



in 



Compliments of 

G. A. FINCK & SON 

Insurance Agency 

63 Main Street Florence, Mat*. 


DAILY HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE 


Compliments of 

HERLIHY'S STORE 

76 Maplo St. Florence 


E. % J. CIGAR COMPANY, INC. 

Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

PIONEER VALLEY GINGER ALE CO. 

& 
PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

Main Street, Corner Chestnut 
Florence, Mass. 


BERKSHIRE ETCHING CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of Namoplatot 



IV 



fins 




ELECTRIC SHOP 



t* CCNTCR ST. PHONE I SOT 

Nc . (hampton, Mass. 



Comploto EUctric Kitchons 
Oil Burners - Rongos - Rofrigorators 
Wiring Servico Sinco 1900 



StRlOr 



PHARMACY! 

CoSIMO Serio Re^Phar. 

65 STATE ST NORTHAMPTON 



I ANGT>«'» 



8 



<r Florence §T0RE 

90 /IflPLE ^TREET 



Compliments of 

SONTAG SUNOCO STATION 



SUNOCO GAS - OIL - TIRES aid 
ACCESSORIES 



Sooth Main Stroot 



Williamsburg 



S>gddack'& 




nut 



curvcC 





7 7fc'>7^*ft36vm 



Groin - Lumber - Paints 



Building Materials 



Tol. Williamsburg 271 

and 

Chestorfield 2145 



Compliments of 

ANN AUGUST & CO. 

Northampton Mass. 


Compliments of 

CARL'S APPAREL SHOP 

11 No. Maple St. Florence 


GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY, INC. 

Established 1786 
"From a card to a book" 

Phone 1097 
15 Armory Street Northampton, Mass. 


Compliments of 

SINCAGE PRINTING 


For the young fellow who gradu- 
ates this year we have every* 
thing that he needs for this 
important occasion. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 
NORTHAMPTON 


Awnings 

Furniture Upholstering - Venetian Blinds 

Automobile Tops - Seat Covers 

Truck Covers 

Rusco Windows 

CHILSON'S SHOPS 

34 Center Street Northampton 
Phone 1822 



VI 



Yankee Maid DaiVvBai 7 



Steaks - S&a Foods 



Dn Route 9. L eed's 



Compliments of 

MURPHY DETECTIVE AGENCY, 
INC. 

245 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



CALLAHAN'S 5 & 10 STORE 



81 Main St. 



Florence 



NEWELL 'S FUNERAL HOME 

R. D. NEWELL & SON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Private Ambulance Service 

R. D. Newell, Jr. 

Tel. 2012 R 
Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

P. Ahearn Co. 



2 Pomeroy Terr. 
Northampton 



64 Main Street 
Florence 




CotnD/t'/fftn'fc of 



N *- » tUNCKAl SERVICE ' / 

114 KING STREET . NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



ML 



/ C/t)€rt/ / /On 



'/9s?s//c/</s/ or)Zrrt/ / /On?C 



//^<j/thi//'//c 



A//1SS. 




\58 PIeasant ST. 




Dodge 




Plymouth 



Tel. 3092 

NORTHAMPTON, VI ASS. 



VII 



<= 




Pete to ChinCcillC. 



P 



Norma Lee. Candy 

<j2 Kwq it. fiorlhamptorr 
Til 772 ^ 



Compliments of 



BROWN'S MARKET 

Quality Meat*, Groceries 
and Provisions 



218 State St. 



Northampton 



W. N. POTTER 
GRAIN STORES, Inc. 

WIRTHMORE FEEDS 
BUILDING SUPPLIES 




Northampton, Mass. 



Tel. 228 



G. J. MORRISON 

Proscription Optician 

163 Main - Opposite McCallum's 



Jane Alden Products 

UNITED DAIRY 

23 Hooker Avenue 
Northampton 

cream - buttermilk - ice cream - butter 



Brookside Dair^ f Inc. 

19 Hawley Street, Northampton, Mass. 
Serving Williamsburg 



Household Goods-. 

£1 a « U//Ai! 







, 



WALTER'S 
APPLIANCES & FURNITURE 

DISTRIBUTOR OF BOTTLE GAS 

Phone Northampton 396B 



Walter strycharz 



206 RUSSELL STREET 
HAOLEY, MASS. 



$T Jaime j%d 
\ -niprior ^aerator _ 

t» w ^ Jil -418 

16 (raft} (lit JUbrthomj^toM J|o)V 



VIII 



150-154 Main Strut Northampton 

42 Groon Stroot Massachusetts 



tr±'' 



tosun* MHCy. 





CJ 



A. W. Borawski 

Insurors and Realtors 

T.I. 254 
56 Main Str*»t Northampton 



CondfrftH IrVftonS +"ot^£, Gw*dua'Hn£ C Uss ot OT 

FOSTER FARRAR COMPANY 

Comi \\ttl first (SvA SftVi Tirvu, ftnd Honci^ . 

U>2f1AlN ST. TEL. 11 

IX 



QgzpAmuM^^p 






goto BRANDLE'S first 

To Save Timt and Trouble for Your 
PRESCRIPTIONS 



Main Str««t 



Nortk«M»«M 










To Cover ALL Your Needs 

KING % C US H MAN, Inc. 

259 Main Street 
Nerthampton Telephone 6(0 



WHlEflc * 

IPflKEGLOlCi 

15 ^£ Street NortU>" 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 



161 Main St. 



Phone 715 



Cohtn U/-OS. 



"Best LJ'rstaes 



f 



t-ot-o 



H-i m^.n St Ttl.<bG8 



^ 



4uTo $oty 

ZZo(&Tr<j $t. QlortyaMptbn 



Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON AUTO PARTS 

SCRAP IRON and METALS 
USED AUTO PARTS 



S. R. Shermata 



King St. 



BASILE ELECTRIC CO. 

King Street Northampton 

Sylvania T.V. - Zenith T.V. 

G.E. FfigfcUire 
and 

Florence, Kelvinator and Bengal Ranges 



LEIUH 



^Z^AMPIOJ^^ 



XI 



^. J . <7 TluJttftlLmaA^ 
t/A 4181 "fYUuwJi. 



Cnrrjpl»mLn"l"5 af 

[ h& Lunch Bd 



Led DuvrI 



lURm St. 



UJi llmmsbura 



Compliments of 

R. F. BURKE 

Williamsburg, Massachusetts 



COLONIAL CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning — Dyeing 
Weekly Pickup - Delivery Service 



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CompU prints oj- 



171c A 



ORvdtn 



vous ORvaLns 

u.&.^u.o. rncAvou 

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XII 



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The 
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\< 



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t^cri 






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* 



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Tel. 4331 - 4333 



HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 

Incorporated 



Manufacturers of 
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XIII 



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F. N. GRAVES & SON , Inc. 

WILLIAMSBURG 



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— Deposits are insured for the FULL AMOUNT under the laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

— Deposits draw interest from the fifteenth day of each month, 
the rate being 3 per cent. 

BANKING HOURS 

Monday through Friday — 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Friday Evenings — 6 to 8 



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NORTHAMPTON 



IZaSyt. 





\5 BrUae. Studi TU. 4200 YW+ta/ntfiicm/ 



XIV 



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185 Main Street 



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CompUwenif of 




NorHcutipion 



*ss#*Z 



rt» -?^ ns ' 



tt 



VA&w 



£ ## & 



W-> 



hi, 42 SO J 



Haskell & Gilbert 

247 Main Street Tel. 672 

Northampton, Mass* 

A complete line of school supplies 
Portable typewriters for sale & rent 



LAUNDRY CENTER 



35 State St. 
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Tel. 329 



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Tel. 998 



39 Main St. Northampton, Massachusetts 






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Congratulations to the Graduates 



FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 



t/lortAampton 
^/Massachusetts 



37 Main Street 



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XV 



TDODS 



t 



or 



Drtssts 



Sport's **J t*ir 

Q\r\WA+tr\ % *t LJcftV 
AcCtS*Ovi*S 

X2(ofrU\ t r\ St. 88Gnc« St. 

NortV>«mpton 



Compliments of 

Northampton's Newest and Smartest 
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CAHILL AND HODGES 

Northampton 






£ 



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.c> t 

\^ r Northompton t riftSS, 



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Williamsburg 



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Telephone 819 Northampton 

KAISER-WILLy'S 

Sales and Service 



HECTOR A. AREL CO. 

* 

CMC Tracks 
Sales & Service 

Northampton Tel. 2445 

EUctti't v Gas WeMing 



XVI 




88"fiUaMn& fireet ** 




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THE HAYDEPILLE COMPffl 





PIlVAKIl I MI'RPIIY I'r.-r 

vaicmes invm.RY 

VA'ICM KEPAIkMNO 



IN Main Sln-et 



Morcmr. Ma«*«u'hu»*lt4 



PKot© graphic Supplies " D»«w«o^6 - UrttcVxCfc- l^i rv^s ~~ 
243M*tn St. rWtV>*n>pTon Tel. 23fc5 



gMCtDAK Chest 




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177 Main Strict 
Northampton. Mass. 



.• 3 • *•• • 








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ftu*~t"Omoloi I L, 
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PI or etnt. t. 



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9f 




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3>i^ m 

V 



XVIII 



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HERBS and ANNUALS 

CHOICE PERENNIALS 

For Rock Garden and Border 

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THEKRRUSHRR PRESS 



PRINTERS -PUBLISHERS 



30tRRFTb PWE. NORTHAMPTON 



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Rtftl tsVfstt- r»md TnsyVflncL 
f|ovtr»ct BftVm^S Bftr» K Gui!dir^£ 

Fl o*-e net f Mass. 
Tel. 123 



XIX 



Chesterfield, Mass. 



Pizzitola Music Stvdios 

"The School of Achievement" 
^ccorckjn- Guitar & feiATivtI*ntuiiEircs 

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TEL2U50 142 MAIN Jt 

Northampton .Mass. 



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Write for latest catalog. 

Our 59th Fall Term Commences September, 1954 

NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 
Founded 1896 



Congratulations and continual success in the 
future. This is the wish of the leading men's 
and boys' wearing apparel store in North- 
ampton. 



HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 

RMpk J. ttv^ , Prtsidfcnt 



r 






*r\6 



~\ 



The Business MftnAglr 
l<_ ->l 



XX 




John L. Bftnttt,*-, SfcC 



W. Bt-ictUttA NftS^tP^S. 



A FRicnd 



Cc*t>/> h'h*C*ts of 



Bfl TURft 'S 



HILLVOOO FARM 

AliCL ¥ Otis Go5S 



XXI 





TILEY'S SERVICE STATION 


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North eiMTi T/vaM 

TAcci STta Ho\si"c'inS 


SflARtS BEAUT) SAWN 

TEL. 30U UILIIM1S&URG 


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HOLT OK C • NORTHAMPTON • PITTSFICLD 

Biflttnrtiup fHonumrnts 


Compliments of 

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SHOES - CLOTHING 

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Tel. Northampton 1586 

Floronco Massachusetts 


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24 Main Stroot 
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18 Cantor Strool 

Northampton Mass. 


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LEEDS, MASS. 


Compliments of 

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HAYDENVILLE 


C H. STAAB'S FILLING STATION 

Gas and Motor Oil 

Tol. 2139 
150 Com Stroot 

Northampton Moss. 


QcuckAututti' 


NORTHAMPTON 
FROZEN FOOD LOCKER 

"Wo honey cure and 
hickory smoke" 
Hawloy Street —Northampton, Mass. 


C om p\ i «v\ £ nT 6 O y 

CHUCK'S 


iTlcAU.steVS £$SO StAt'ton 
r «vO'»t-Tirfci- fl*ctssop/ r 




Al Chfit»ots &sso 
Hemp's Ft-iuidlicsT St«1Sor> 

MO>UA«*«t ST- Phwt »I04 


WaItc* LDcwwy 

Opt"i ct ft r> 
Ttl • \ 84- NowtUnmp+cm 


C om p/t'mtnrs of- 




Cotwp l.'mtb'ks of 

Chkisftn^on'S 




CERRUTI'5 

^PleBSfWT 5T~. NoirThnmphsn 


Buraif B Ipaulg &alon 

• 9 MAIN STRICT. FLORENCE TIUFHONI JI7 




Comp/i mints of 

Xntp&fr-ifll B^KbVlj 


Compel mtn'V 6 O-y- 

GftAy'S MARKET 

FLORtMCe 


PACKAGE STORE 
'phomc mu 




XXII 





1 




XXIII 




Williamsburg; W*$h ^t\}ool 

(Class ^igljt ^xcrrises 




y 







FV^^B^ 






HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1954 



Now that we are Seniors and our High School days are over, it seems that 
only yesterday we were Freshmen. But when we were Freshmen, the day when we 
would be Seniors seemed so very far away. 

When we entered high school in September of 1950, we felt lost and uncertain. 
Our class numbered twenty-six students, some of whom were shy and scared to 
death, and others loud and boisterous; all from towns far and near. The new at- 
mosphere of high school was different and it took us a while to get used to the 
new routine. 

As the year progressed, Mrs. Grinnell managed to get us on our feet and we 
had our first class meeting to elect officers; Bobby Bisbee as president, led 
us through our shaky first year, and remained our class president for the next 
three years. 

In that first year, the Freshmen Reception was given for our benefit by the 

Seniors. The atmosphere of that reception was Hallowe'en weird and spooky. 

The outcome was not what we expected and some even enjoyed themselves. As our 
first year came to an end, we were a little more sure of what the coming years 
would be like. 

We entered our Sophomore year feeling a little superior to the new, green 
Freshmen. Our home-room teacher, the late Mr. Ritter, had a lot of patience 
with us, for we were no longer strangers and we began to make ourselves right 
at home. 

We decided to start raising money for our New York trip, so we had our first 
food sale, followed by a card party. Also, a few prosperous students paid 
their class dues and that helped a bit. So ended our second year of high school. 

Our Junior Class numbered only eighteen, but we all felt wonderful because 
we were nearing our last year and our long awaited New York trip was getting 
closer. With Mr. Branch as our home-room teacher, we settled down and went 
right to work. 

We had a food sale and later the annual Junior Prom, which was held in the 
school assembly hall. Together with a few other money raising projects, we had 
quite a bit of money in our treasury as our Junior year ended. 

Now at last we were Seniors, with Mr. Peter Ball as our home-room teacher 
and class advisor. But our fourth and last year was not at all what we had ex- 
pected. 

Our first disappointment came when we found we were not going on a class 
trip to New York. We soon got over it and began planning for the school play. 
We selected "Who Killed Aunt Caroline?", a mystery-comedy three-act play by 
Grant Richards. Mr. Parent came to the first rehearsal and gave out the parts. 
Then, an unfortunate thing happened. Due to illness, Mr. Parent was unable to 
be our director so we had to find another. Mrs. Halberstadt took over and di- 
rected the play marvelously, considering what she had to direct. 



Having no assembly hall, we were forced to rehearse in the laboratory at 
school c Aside from other difficulties, such as lack of attendance at rehearsals, 
failure to learn parts and so on, the play was a success, much to our surprise. 

After the play was over, we considered a class picnic, since we wouldn T t be 
together much longer as a class. After weeks of bickering and arguing, we de- 
cided to hold the picnic at the D. A c R. in Goshen on Memorial Day with Mr. and 
Mrs, George Conant as chaperonsc The affair was quite successful and those who 
went enjoyed themselves. 

On June 12 we were invited to the Alumni Banquet, which was held at the Con- 
gregational Church and we all became members of the Alumni Association c On 
June 14 we held our Class Banquet at the Log Cabin where we all enjoyed a fine 
meal and entertainment . 

Nov/ our four years of high school have come to a close. Many will leave 
for parts unknown, but we all will remember these four treasured years. We wish 
each other the best of luck and happiness in whatever the future holds for us. 

Yvonne Dufresne 



CLASS PROPHECY 



"Oh, 2000 A. D. I never thought I f d live to see the turn of the century. 
When I was a Senior in Williamsburg High School, 2000 A.D. seemed centuries 
away, but here it is. I wonder what my classmates are doing now. Maybe seme 
have gone on to the happy hunting grounds.. „. I found my old diary that I wrote 
around 1974. 

Jan. 3, 1974 

Yesterday, I received a ticket for overcrowding my hellicopter, and today 
while at court I saw Yvonne Dufresne decked out in police togs. She told me 
she had become disgusted with the crime and law set-up and is now head of the 
Air Police Department. (That seems odd — Yvonne was the quiet one in our class.) 

Feb, 8, 1974 

This afternoon I bumped into Janice Richardson and Nancy Brewer down street. 
They were headed for dinner and so I joined them. Janice told me she owns her 
own beauty salon. She went to a hair-dressing school after high school and is 
now the leading hair stylist in the city. Nancy Brewer graduated from a nurse's 
training school, but she has since gone into partnership with Janice. 

March 5, 1974 

One day last week as I was doing some research on a nature and conservation 
program, I was interested and surprised to find a book on "Birds, Beasts, and 
Beauty" by Norman Stone. He wrote the book and did his own photography. (As I 
remember, Norman was forever popping up with his flash camera in high school, 
especially when wc least expected it.) The book is very interesting and tech- 
nical, just what I was looking for. 

April 7, 1.974 

Tonight I attended a concert given by my old classmate, Jane Beals, in which 
she played an all classical program. Backstage I asked her if that was what 
she had done since high school c She said that she had taken lessons from Rubin- 
stein, the great pianist, but she still likes jazz and often plays for square 
and round dances. She is also giving lessons now. 

May 12, 1974 

Last, night I stopped at a restaurant-type farm house. The food served there 
was the good old-fashioned kind and I investigated to find out who was responsi- 
ble for the cooking. It was none other than Lucy Mathers. She told me that 
she and her husband run the farm on which they raise many different kinds of 
animals which the city slickers find very amusing. Lucy cooks the old-fashioned 
meals for the visitors. She has also edited a book of her favorite recipes , 



June 20, 1974 

I stopped in at the college research laboratory yesterday with one of my 
sick chickens to have it diagnosed . When I arrived, Tony Soltys was working on 
some cultures. We had a nice chat. He has been working in the research field 
since graduating from the University of Massachusetts, He says that he enjoys 
the work of finding the little harmful or useful bacteria, whichever the case 
may be. 

July 30, 1974 

Today I met Barbara Cumm at an orphanage. She said that she had been singing 
opera in New York for five years. She is now a nun in charge of the orphanage . 
(Barbara was voted the most garrulous person of the Class of '54, ) Therefore 
I'm surprised to find her in an orphanage. I thought she might go into politics. 

August 16, 1974 

Will Woebking paid me a visit today. I had not seen him since I was in 
Germany two years ago. (Will was the German exchange student that was with us 
during our Senior year.) He is a high German diplomat and the big ten nations 
of the world are negotiating for space-wide peace. Will is the German represen- 
tative headed for the conference on Jupiter. I think I will go with Will as 
I've never seen Jupiter. 

September 3, 1974 

I T m on my way to Jupiter. The stewardess on my rocket ship is Anne Ice. 
She lost her indifferent and slow ways and joined the Women's Air Force after 
high school. She makes a very capable and pretty stewardess — always on her toes 
to help her passengers. 

September 4, 1974 

Last night I walked to the piloting room of the rocket ship because I was 
feeling a bit space sick. Much to my surprise I saw Robert Bisbee piloting the 
rocket. He joined the Air Force soon after high school where he learned to pilot 
jets, but jets weren't fast enough for him so now he holds one of the titles for 
speed with the rockets. 

October 5, 1974 

While on Jupiter I met Connie Packard, Mary Smart, and Ellen Ames, who were 
taking a vacation from earth. They said that at the last high school reunion 
they had decided to travel together. We had a nice chat together and I learned 
what they had been doing. 



Connie is a registered nurse, having received her degree at Albany Hospital, 
and is now an Army nurse, 

Ellen said that she is a stenographer and is happily married to her former 
boss. They are now in partnership—the present question with her is ,f Who is 
the boss— -NOW??" 

Mary said that she is a transmitter. Her duties are something like those 
of a telephone operator, connecting all the planets by radar screens. After 
high school Mary went on to a technical school where she learned her profession. 

November 29, 1074 

Yesterday I was asked to give a little talk on my experiences on Jupiter. 
Professor William Hayden was in charge of the assembly. He told me that in 
September, 1954, he joined the service where he realized the importance of a 
high school education. He went on to college and graduated Cum Laude. 

December 3, 1974 

Helen Sroczyk dropped in to see me this morning. (And dropped in she did for 
we were all driving hellicopters at the time. If you didn't you weren't keeping 
up with the times.) Helen heard me speak at the assembly meeting a week ago 
and so looked me up. She is happily married but still teaching. I hope she 
has lost her dislike for boys for she has six little urchins of her own now. 

Well, I saw all of my classmates in 1974, which was the 20th anniversary of 
graduating from high school. They all had succeeded to a high degree. I 
wonder what they are doing today? ....If they have gone on in their chosen 
fields, they will have benefited the world greatly. 



CUSS WILL 



We, the class of 1954, being of sound mind and body and being aware of our 
extraordinary gifts, do hereby bequeath them to the following: 



Article 1 

Article 2 
Article 3 
Article 4 
Article 5 

Article 6 



Section I 

To Miss Dunphy Will Woeking leaves a booklet entitled "The Perfect 
Detective". He thinks it will aid her in future investigations. 
Janice Richardson leaves her good nature to Mr. Tonet. 
Nancy Brewer leaves her muscles to Mr. Ball. 
To Mrs. Grinnell we leave "one" intelligent milkman. 
To Mr. Branch we leave all the Senior Scholastics we have accumu- 
lated during our four years. 

We leave Mrs e Smith's English class hoping we haven 1 t caused her 
too many grey hairs. 

Section II 



Article 1 

Article 2 

Article 3 
Article 4 

Article 5 

Article 6 



Article 7 
Article 8 



Article 9 
Article 10 

Article 11 



Barbara Cumm leaves her ability to make friends in Chesterfield 
to any cirl who thinks she can do as well as Barbara has. 
Sondra Black leaves her "love" for class meetings to the Juniors 
with this advice, "always take a vote." 
Mary Smart leaves her height to Christine Ice. 

Helen Sroczyk leaves her brains to the many students in the high 
school that need them. 

Bobbv Bisbee leaves his frequent trips to the office for being 
tardy to Rolfe Bryant. 

Jane Beals leaves her "Tattler" headaches to Jackie Morin, next 
year's editor with this advice, "If you ever expect to get the 
"Tattler" out on time, you had better start working on it now." 
Anne Ice finally leaves typing class. 

Norman Stone leaves his job as photographer for the "Tattler" to 
Allison Sharpe. He hopes she won't have the trouble he did 
standing on the chairs in the halls to get the changing of classes 
Yvonne Dufresne leaves the same wav she entered high school, 
saying nothing, 

Connie Packard leaves the twenty-six volumes she completed while 
in high school on "Everyday Love Troubles" to the school library 
for use by the fairer sex of the Williamsburg High School. 
Lucy Mathers leaves her spelling ability to David Breguet. 



8 



Section III 



Article 1 



Article 2 
Article 3 
Article 4 
Article 5 

Article 6 



Ellen Jane Ames leaves the tea bag she used to kill Aunt Caroline 

with to Mrs. Halberstadt so that she may have something to remember 

us by. 

To the Freshmen we leave the courage to go on. 

To the unruly Sophomores we leave the Seniors* dignity. 

To the Juniors we leave a class trip to New York. 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a megaphone so everyone will be able to 

hear him when he talks . 

We leave Mr. Bisbee a set of mechanical brooms to sweep up the 

spit-balls in the Freshmen room. 



Having disposed of our priceless possessions we have only sympathy and con- 
dolences left to give to the remaining students struggling through Burgy High. 

Executed on this sixteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand 

nine hundred and fifty- four. 



Signed by the Class of f 54 
Witnessed by 

The Creep 

Class Mascot 

The Shadow 




GRADUATION 




r ' 




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i 














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10 



BASEBALL RESULTS 



Player 


AB 


Hits 


Runs 


Errors 


BB 


K-2 


Ave. 


Packard 


33 


7 


6 


1 


9 


11 


.212 


Bowker 


25 


2 


7 


3 


17 


7 


.080 


Dymerski 


30 


10 


11 


2 


8 


11 


.333 


Healy 


26 


7 


4 


2 


8 


12 


.269 


Moynahan 


26 


10 


4 





11 


3 


.384 


Braman 


28 


6 


3 


2 


6 


5 


.214 


Learnard 


20 





4 


5 


8 


9 


.000 


R. Heath 


27 


3 


3 


2 


6 


11 


.111 


M. Heath 


23 


4 


1 





8 


8 


.173 


Liimatainien 


5 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


.200 


Rice 


2 








1 





1 


.000 




245 


50 


44 


19 


83 


80 


.204 




IP 


Hits 


BB 


SO 


Won 


Lost 




Moynahan 


58 


31 


17 


93 


5 


3 




Dymerski 


20 


11 


9 


23 


1 


2 






J. Moynahan and 
Toski Award 



"PROPHECY ON THE PROPHETESS" 



It is the year of 1974 and I have just taken off in my new jet airship, for a trial run. The weather 
is good to fair and the wind is still blowing. I am traveling North at the speed of 90 miles ahead of sound. 
The sun is shining brightly and as I come near the planet Jupiter, I find that all is well; Saturn is fine 
also. Mars is just ahead and I suddenly feel my airship fall slightly. I am right over Mars when everything 
goes black and I am falling — down — down — down. I land in something and I hear a flutter, yes, a flutter of 
little wings and as I start to pick myself up — I hear a noise. 

"Get off my prize layers"-I look up and see a tall blond woman surrounded by children and chickens holding 
a double-barreled shotgun. 

"Mam, I think I've seen you somewhere" — and then the dawn comes and I know that this woman is no other 
than Sondra Black — my high school chum of '54. As we sit down and talk of old times, I ask — "Sondra, what on 
earth, I mean Mars, are you doing here?" 

"I'm promoting my chicken business to the Martians," she exclaims. "They seem to be doing very fine — 
don't you think?" 

I stammer yes, for I had always known Sondra had taken a great interest and pride in raising chickens — 
but I never thought it would go this far! 

Just then — one of her ten little children comes out with a huge necklace of gold medals. She explains that 
in addition to her medals, she earned in her early 'teens at Burgy High, she has won many on Mars— for chickens 
are something fantastic and she has won so many medals for them — that to each child — she has given a necklace 
of medals. 

"Sondra, what have you been doing since |our graduation in '54," I ask her. 

"After I graduated — I went to the 4 -H Camp in Goshen as counselor. The following winter, I did not go to 
college as I planned — but eloped with one of my farmer friends and while on earth we made sweet music. Then, 
in 1960, I entered the "Chicken of Mars" Contest and I won the highest award in the country, along with a 
free one-way trip to Mars, for two. 

"Yes, continue," I say excitedlv, for I am very excited to hear that Sondra has won such a wonderful contest! 

She continues to say — "We came here to Mars and liked it so well that we have been here for 14 years and like 
it better than the earth. The Martians have taken us in as though we were one of them." 

"I bet they have," I answer. 

After more reminiscing. I bid her adieu and get back in my airship. As I return to earth, I remember that 
Sondra has always been a brilliant and wise girl and I know "that I will never forget my visit with her on Mars. 

Anne Ice 



11 







B 
A 

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